vermont fiddle heads Search vt-fiddle

Archive for December, 2010

this week’s ASK LINDA – a question about juicing

Wednesday, December 22nd, 2010

Linda,

I just purchased a Champion Juicer but I’m considering sending it back. WHY? Because I’ve been making amazing juices with the Vitamix. I basically throw the ingredients in the Vitamix, whirl well and then strain through one of the nut milk bags I got at your place. It works really well and I can’t see it being any easier than that!! It’s quick easy and no cleanup!

Help…your thoughts please…..I’ve been drinking 1-2 juices a day..and I don’t mind straining in the nut milk bag. Plus I add a little water when whirling in vitamix so that adds a little extra to the juice. With the juicer, I will be adding no water thus NOT getting as much juice………………..what do ya think??! ——C

Hi there C,
Yep, I agree with you on the Vitamix/nut milk bag juicing technique. It works very well. The champion was a lot of clean up for me so I sold mine. If you are doing a great job with the blending/straining, I’d say send back the Champion and keep doing what you are doing. The Champion was my second juicer and it does a great job with root veggies and some fruits but doesn’t do well with greens. In the beginning of my juicing days, I wasn’t juicing greens so I didn’t have a need for them. I used to use it to make some kick ass nut butters but now use the food processor for them because it’s a lot less to clean up. I think the blending/straining works really well because it really gets the greens masticated and so uses more of the greens. A lot of the time in my juicer that I use now, I find whole pieces of greens in the compost bucket. I think it also seems to use less veggies to get a decent amount of liquid and the nut milk bags strain soooo well. A lot of people who use juicers will use our bags for straining, too because it gets all the fiber out where juicers leave some in.

Of course I want to say that these are just my opinions. I don’t want to yuck anyone’s yum here, not any juicing company or people that love their juicers. I want to say that because I think it’s important to acknowledge we all have different taste preferences and I’m just sharing mine.
Thanks for the great question and keep up the great work!
xoxo,

Linda

to read more, please go here.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Ask Linda! Please feel free to submit your questions to linda AT vt-fiddle.com. Questions don’t have to be completely raw food related but please bring questions on health, recipes, diet, weight issues, nutrition, parenting, nursing, pregnancy, spirituality or whatever it is you’d like to ask. I’ll do my best to answer and will most certainly learn from this as much as I can give.

this week’s ASK LINDA – about green smoothies

Wednesday, December 15th, 2010

This week’s question: Would you be willing to share your fav greens smoothie recipe? I’m trying to do better 🙂  —M

This week’s answer: Hello there M! First here’s a basic green smoothie recipe is: (serving one)

a good couple handfuls of greens (lettuce, kale, chard, spinach, edible weeds in the summer, green sprouts, etc – stay away from the more bitter greens for green smoothies like arugula as they dominate the flavor.) so it would be about 1 cup packed or 2 loose cups.

1/2 cup of fresh or frozen berries (can substitute with pears, peaches, apples, oranges, pineapple, mango or any fruit you like) – feel free to add more if you want.

1 banana

1 1/2 cups water

Blend up and drink. This is the basic green smoothie and can be added to and varied. To make it my favorite (and particularly as it gets colder out), I like adding a heaping TBSP green powder like Vitamineral Green to get a whole lot of green nutrition added. I’ll sometimes add a TBSP maca. I’ll typically add some coconut oil to mine, some vegan protein powder during colder months, hemp or nut milk instead of water sometimes to make it really creamy. Sometimes I’ll add a sweetener if the fruit isn’t sweet enough (particularly when kids and husbands are sharing with me. Sometimes we can tolerate new things better when they are sweet. So that would be a tsp of agave or honey or maybe a date or two.) Also, I add some chia for those lovely omegas! And last but not least, every couple/few days, I’ll add a little sprinkle of cacao nibs to the smoothie too.

But that’s the basics. They are yummy! Also good to note that lettuces like romaine won’t turn the smoothie totally green so it is a good “starter” smoothie for people who get weird about the color. Also note: REMEMBER TO CHEW YOUR SMOOTHIES! (Chew your drink and drink your food!)

Have fun!

I also just have to say that my favorite smoothie is the one that I’m drinking! They all taste great. This morning’s smoothie had: banana, local org blueberries, local greens, Vitamineral Green, coconut oil, chia and some medicinal mushrooms like reishi. OH and I put in a bit of sunflower seed butter this morning because I was hungry!! I drink about 32 ounces of green smoothie throughout the morning.

Take care,
Linda

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Ask Linda! Please feel free to submit your questions to linda AT vt-fiddle.com. Questions don’t have to be completely raw food related but please bring questions on health, recipes, diet, weight issues, nutrition, parenting, nursing, pregnancy, spirituality or whatever it is you’d like to ask. I’ll do my best to answer and will most certainly learn from this as much as I can give.

this week’s ASK LINDA: where can I find those happy shakes ingredients?

Thursday, December 9th, 2010

Question: Where can I find Stacy’s Happy Shake ingredients?

Answer: Great question! I’ve put together a lil page on my website with Stacy’s recipe plus ingredient listing so you have one stop shopping.

Here’s the link: http://vt-fiddle.com/shop/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=56_74

If you are familiar with Stacy Stower’s happy shake, then you’ve come to the right place. Here we have her recipe laid out and if you scroll down below, you can order the ingredients right here on the same page.

The Happy Shake – serves 1
by Stacy Stowers

1. The BASE:

3-4 cups fresh spinach…..GREEN is Glorious!
1/2 cup liquid…..water, juice, nut milk. it’s your choice…
1Tbsp coconut oil…good fat won’t make you fat! This is essential for a healthy happy body, keeping you satisfied and metabolizing the spinach.
1Tbsp Hemp Seed….protein! This can be sprinkled in after blending if you prefer.
3 drops Marine Phytoplankton

2. The “HAPPY” Part:

1/2-1Tbsp Maca….for stamina, endurance, mental clarity and peak sexual performance for both men and women
1Tbsp Raw Cacao (Raw Chocolate)…in it’s Raw state chocolate is actually a valuable potent super-food loaded with nutrients and neuro-peptides very similar to the ones our bodies create when we are in LOVE!
1Tbsp a super GREEN RAW powder….GREEN is highly alkalizing. This is crucial! Very important for weight management and longevity!
1 Tbsp bee pollen (can be sprinkled on top at the end.)

I package and bring the “Happy” part on the road with me for my families. You can also get your super foods from my super friend Linda Wooliever at vt-fiddle.com. Meet Linda right here on Face Book!!!

3. Add your favorite frozen fruit……bananas, berries, mango, papaya.

4. BLEND!!!!!……this is the”sludge”

Now go out and have the Best DAY Ever!!!!

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Ask Linda! Please feel free to submit your questions to linda AT vt-fiddle.com. Questions don’t have to be completely raw food related but please bring questions on health, recipes, diet, weight issues, nutrition, parenting, nursing, pregnancy, spirituality or whatever it is you’d like to ask. I’ll do my best to answer and will most certainly learn from this as much as I can give.

my sweetie cakes recipe

Thursday, December 9th, 2010

here’s my sweetie cakes recipe

2 cups golden flax seeds
1 cup soaked and/or sprouted raw buckwheat
1/2 cup raw agave
1 tsp lemon oil
a pinch of himalayan sea salt
1 cup filtered water

In a dry Vitamix pitchers, blend 2 cups of dry golden flax seeds in order to turn them into flour. Pour into a bowl. Then take 1 cup soaked raw buckwheat and blend in  the Vitamix pitcher along with the agave, lemon oil and sea salt and pour into the bowl with the flax. Then add 1 cup filtered water and hand mix until well combined. Pour on a dehydrator sheet and spread evenly with a rubber scraper. This recipe is for one 14 x 14 dehydrator tray only. This should be thick on the tray. Score into the shapes/sizes you want and dehydrate for 6-8 hours at 105 degrees. Then flip the sheet and take off the dehydrator sheet and see if it needs anymore dehydrating. These cakes should remain pliable and chewy.

NOTES on soaking and sprouting raw buckwheat
For this recipe, you want to start with hulled raw buckwheat. You do not want to use the buckwheat seeds that you use for sprouting in soil that have the dark hulls still on them. You also don’t want to use kasha – that is toasted buckwheat and it will turn to mush as soon as you soak it.

To soak the buckwheat: Put a slightly rounded 1/3 cup of buckwheat in a bowl and cover it with fresh water. Let it soak overnight. The buckwheat will plump up in size considerably. Pour buckwheat into a colander and rinse under the tap. Soaked buckwheat will turn the water slimy so keep rinsing until the water goes clear. They are ready to blend now unless you want to sprout them.

To sprout the buckwheat: After you’ve rinsed them, put them back in the colander and keep the bowl underneath to catch the water. Cover with a clean kitchen towel. Continue to rinse the buckwheat two more times on that first day: once in the evening when you get home from work and then once before bed. In the morning, rinse again and repeat rinsing in the early evening and night before bed. After about 2 or 3 days (depending on the time of year) you will have sprouted buckwheat. Now you can use them to make sprouted recipes.  Using sprouted grains are much more digestible for people and the yields are good, making this a very economical way to eat! (By the way, buckwheat are not a gluten product!)

Happy sweetie cakes!
Linda

this week’s ASK LINDA: this one is about coconut oil

Thursday, December 2nd, 2010

this week’s question is great: What do you think – if coconut oil is stable at high heat, why does it matter about buying truly raw versus a brand like Nutiva Organic cold-pressed (which is the one i’ve been buying)? Just wanted to get your opinion. 🙂 Thanks. —V.

Answer: This is such a thought-provoking question to me! The first thing that comes to my mind is this method of how the oil gets extracted and how it gets checked for temperature. It’s always really unclear to me how any product can be labeled as truly “raw” because there are so many variables (the sun, traveling in hot trucks, sitting in hot warehouses, to name a few.) But I do know that all food has glorious flavors and textures to it. When I have food that is cooked, I feel different then when it is raw. Whether I choose to cook or not, I want to be sure that my food comes to me in the most minimally processed way. Again, that’s hard to do when things are being shipped from all over the globe and I can do my part by growing my own, buying local and buying raw because that at least tells me I’m trying to receive minimally processed good foods. Then I can chose how I’m going to adulterate or process my food however I want! LOL

I am also not a  “purist” in the matter of being totally 100% raw (I found that I got myself into a tizzy about everything needing to be PURE and RAW and for me, it was more healthy to stop being such a policeman (for lack of a better word) about it; I do believe that we make the best choices for ourselves that fit our taste and budgets.  I’ve purchased the same Nutiva coconut products as you have, and I have enjoyed it very much. I sell a centrifugal, raw, cold pressed coconut oil that comes to me from Ultimate Superfoods and I also enjoy that coconut very much. I’ve tried many coconut oils and some I like more than others. I’ve had a lot of coconut oils turn rancid on me from big raw people out there and I buy the stuff from Ultimate purely because they supply me with a lot of things lately, so it’s a matter of convenience. I do like the taste and feel of their coconut oil, though.

I wanted to touch briefly on this tip I learned about coconut oil being a great oil particularly if you are going to cook with it. There’s links below where you can find more information, but to sum it up, coconut oil doesn’t turn carcinogenic when you are cooking with it so you would be wise to change your cooking oils to a really nice coconut oil. I had read that if you wanted to use olive oil, the best way to “cook” with it would be to steam cook whatever you wanted to normally cook with olive oil, remove it from the heat and then add the olive oil. That way the olive oil wouldn’t start to smoke and possibly turn your meal into something less than healthful for you.

http://helpguide.org/life/healthy_diet_cancer_prevention.htm – here’s link that talks a bit about the oil/cooking/carcinogens but you have to scroll down to near the bottom to read about it.

http://www.organicfacts.net/organic-oils/organic-coconut-oil/health-benefits-of-coconut-oil.html – this is link on the health benefits of coconut oil.

http://products.mercola.com/coconut-oil/ – recommends only using coconut oil to cook with

http://rawcoconutoil.org/ – another good article on coconut oil and this one goes into a bit on the matter of whether or not coconut oil can really be called “VIRGIN” or not. Also goes into heating of coconut oil.

http://www.tiana-coconut.com/expeller_pressed_coconut_oil.htm – this goes into expeller pressing vs. centrifugal pressing, etc.

But still, the question is about what’s the point about buying a raw cold pressed oil if you are just going to cook with it and it remains stable in high heat anyway? I think it has to do with how the oils are extracted. I’ve been reading on it and it looks like there are many ways to extract the oil and organic and cold pressed or lower temperatures seem to win out, in my opinion, on how healthful the product is. For example, I didn’t even realize that hexane could/would be used to extract oil!

http://www.pccnaturalmarkets.com/guides/tips_cooking_oils.html – a very interesting link on all the ways that oils are extracted. (This is where I learned about hexane and other chemicals used to extract oils… EEK!)

So, in my opinion, I would feel very happy using the Nutiva organic coconut oil that you are using. You can be relatively sure that the oil was expressed in a “humane” way! LOL (That’s so funny! We should call “conventionally” grown/prepared foods as “inhumane!”) I’m also quite happy using my Ulimate Superfoods coconut oil and a few others that I’ve liked as well. I would recommend to always check out the label to see what is in one’s food and GET IN THE HABIT of asking the manufacturers what they use and how they make their products. Our bodies are our temples, after all!

I hope this answers your question and thank you for getting my lil thinking cap on!

Many blessings,

Linda

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Ask Linda! Please feel free to submit your questions to linda AT vt-fiddle.com. Questions don’t have to be completely raw food related but please bring questions on health, recipes, diet, weight issues, nutrition, parenting, nursing, pregnancy, spirituality or whatever it is you’d like to ask. I’ll do my best to answer and will most certainly learn from this as much as I can give.


© 2014 Vermont Fiddle Heads, LLC • Photos were taken by Pat Hazouri • website created by Linda Wooliever