vermont fiddle heads Search vt-fiddle

Posts Tagged ‘breakfast recipe’

this week’s ASK LINDA - about green smoothies

Wednesday, December 15th, 2010

This week’s question: Would you be willing to share your fav greens smoothie recipe? I’m trying to do better :)  —M

This week’s answer: Hello there M! First here’s a basic green smoothie recipe is: (serving one)

a good couple handfuls of greens (lettuce, kale, chard, spinach, edible weeds in the summer, green sprouts, etc - stay away from the more bitter greens for green smoothies like arugula as they dominate the flavor.) so it would be about 1 cup packed or 2 loose cups.

1/2 cup of fresh or frozen berries (can substitute with pears, peaches, apples, oranges, pineapple, mango or any fruit you like) - feel free to add more if you want.

1 banana

1 1/2 cups water

Blend up and drink. This is the basic green smoothie and can be added to and varied. To make it my favorite (and particularly as it gets colder out), I like adding a heaping TBSP green powder like Vitamineral Green to get a whole lot of green nutrition added. I’ll sometimes add a TBSP maca. I’ll typically add some coconut oil to mine, some vegan protein powder during colder months, hemp or nut milk instead of water sometimes to make it really creamy. Sometimes I’ll add a sweetener if the fruit isn’t sweet enough (particularly when kids and husbands are sharing with me. Sometimes we can tolerate new things better when they are sweet. So that would be a tsp of agave or honey or maybe a date or two.) Also, I add some chia for those lovely omegas! And last but not least, every couple/few days, I’ll add a little sprinkle of cacao nibs to the smoothie too.

But that’s the basics. They are yummy! Also good to note that lettuces like romaine won’t turn the smoothie totally green so it is a good “starter” smoothie for people who get weird about the color. Also note: REMEMBER TO CHEW YOUR SMOOTHIES! (Chew your drink and drink your food!)

Have fun!

I also just have to say that my favorite smoothie is the one that I’m drinking! They all taste great. This morning’s smoothie had: banana, local org blueberries, local greens, Vitamineral Green, coconut oil, chia and some medicinal mushrooms like reishi. OH and I put in a bit of sunflower seed butter this morning because I was hungry!! I drink about 32 ounces of green smoothie throughout the morning.

Take care,
Linda

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Ask Linda! Please feel free to submit your questions to linda AT vt-fiddle.com. Questions don’t have to be completely raw food related but please bring questions on health, recipes, diet, weight issues, nutrition, parenting, nursing, pregnancy, spirituality or whatever it is you’d like to ask. I’ll do my best to answer and will most certainly learn from this as much as I can give.

my sweetie cakes recipe

Thursday, December 9th, 2010

here’s my sweetie cakes recipe

2 cups golden flax seeds
1 cup soaked and/or sprouted raw buckwheat
1/2 cup raw agave
1 tsp lemon oil
a pinch of himalayan sea salt
1 cup filtered water

In a dry Vitamix pitchers, blend 2 cups of dry golden flax seeds in order to turn them into flour. Pour into a bowl. Then take 1 cup soaked raw buckwheat and blend in  the Vitamix pitcher along with the agave, lemon oil and sea salt and pour into the bowl with the flax. Then add 1 cup filtered water and hand mix until well combined. Pour on a dehydrator sheet and spread evenly with a rubber scraper. This recipe is for one 14 x 14 dehydrator tray only. This should be thick on the tray. Score into the shapes/sizes you want and dehydrate for 6-8 hours at 105 degrees. Then flip the sheet and take off the dehydrator sheet and see if it needs anymore dehydrating. These cakes should remain pliable and chewy.

NOTES on soaking and sprouting raw buckwheat
For this recipe, you want to start with hulled raw buckwheat. You do not want to use the buckwheat seeds that you use for sprouting in soil that have the dark hulls still on them. You also don’t want to use kasha - that is toasted buckwheat and it will turn to mush as soon as you soak it.

To soak the buckwheat: Put a slightly rounded 1/3 cup of buckwheat in a bowl and cover it with fresh water. Let it soak overnight. The buckwheat will plump up in size considerably. Pour buckwheat into a colander and rinse under the tap. Soaked buckwheat will turn the water slimy so keep rinsing until the water goes clear. They are ready to blend now unless you want to sprout them.

To sprout the buckwheat: After you’ve rinsed them, put them back in the colander and keep the bowl underneath to catch the water. Cover with a clean kitchen towel. Continue to rinse the buckwheat two more times on that first day: once in the evening when you get home from work and then once before bed. In the morning, rinse again and repeat rinsing in the early evening and night before bed. After about 2 or 3 days (depending on the time of year) you will have sprouted buckwheat. Now you can use them to make sprouted recipes.  Using sprouted grains are much more digestible for people and the yields are good, making this a very economical way to eat! (By the way, buckwheat are not a gluten product!)

Happy sweetie cakes!
Linda


© 2014 Vermont Fiddle Heads, LLC • Photos were taken by Pat Hazouri • website created by Linda Wooliever